Wishful Writing

“Your intuition knows what to write, so get out of the way.” — Ray Bradbury

Light a candle. Make a wish.

April’s IWSG question goes like this: If a wish were required to help you write a scene, what sort of scene might that be? For example, fight scene, love scene, death scene? (Wait — all scenes?)

“I’ve never written a scene I couldn’t write.” — CV Grehan

True story. I don’t hope my scenes will fix themselves, but there are other sorts of wishes I wouldn’t mind addressing. My friend lights a candle when she’s hoping for a special turn of events. She splashes a taper with essential oil, and etches the desired outcome into the wax. I like this idea. Sounds procedural, which implies a series of successfully tested steps. I’d require more specifics to feel fully confident in the system, such as, candle color and dimensions, wax composition, source of flame, and length of burn.

What might I wish for?

I’d wish for TIME.


If I could manifest more time, just this week, I would finish two projects, file taxes, and compound a wee bit more interest. I’m sure you could use a longer clock too.

When a scene is giving me fits, I revisit the basics. Two of my favorite resources for this are Dwight Swain’s Techniques of the Selling Writer, and all of the Blake Snyder books.

Don’t leave yet!

Be sure to visit the IWSG Blog Hop co-hosts, J.H. Moncrieff, Natalie Aguirre, Patsy Collins, and Chemist Ken, and IWSG founder, the amazing Alex J. Cavanaugh.

Have you checked out my novelette, KNOW ME? …

KNOW ME by CV Grehan

Overnight, users of the popular social networking site, Know-Me, acquire a duplicate, but dissimilar, identity. Though he claims to be shocked by the doubles’ debut, Know-Me’s CEO, Jason Vrabek, has impressed even himself with this latest testament to his genius. He swears his company has not launched a massive social experiment, something Know-Me has been accused of in the past. While experts investigate the phenomenon, the doubles engage with their counterparts, and Vrabek collects the data.

Alice Merkanowsky, an ordinary office worker, is enthralled with her duplicate self, the glamorous wife of a celebrity chef. Her thrill soon turns into an obsession which strains her marriage, and threatens her grip on reality.

Alice isn’t the only Know-Me casualty. Hoax, or not, the phenomenon triggers consequences that are frighteningly real, even for Vrabek who soon finds himself outmatched by his own genius double.

A science fiction short story. Buy KNOW ME here.

 Thanks for reading to the end!

Images in this post.

Happy 2019

First Wednesday already? IWSG Day!

This month’s IWSG question is about questions: What sort of questions about your writing are you happy to answer, and what questions drive you nuts?

I submit two teeth-gnashing questions.

I bet they will surprise nobody.

But first, my thanks to founder, Alex J. Cavanaugh and this month’s IWSG co-hosts: Patricia Lynne, Lisa Buie-Collard, Kim Lajevardi, and Fundy Blue. Be sure to pay them a visit. If you’d like to participate in the monthly IWSG blog hops, sign up here. Now, those two maddening questions:

#1. Are you published?

If somebody tells you they’re a writer, assume they’re good at their job. It’s not okay to try to put your finger on the pulse of another person’s career. If you can’t stem your curiosity, Google them. Don’t put writers on the spot by demanding proof of their success.

#2. How much do you sell?

Unless you’re my accountant, it’s never cool to ask me how much I earn.

Which questions am I happy to answer? Depends on who’s asking. I tend to avoid talking about writing with non-writers. What I’ve discovered is, most people would rather talk about themselves. I’m content to listen.

Hey, I read a couple of good books over the holiday. Check out Iain Kelly’s A Justified State, and Tal M. Klein’s The Punch Escrow. Both are winners!

And, hey, I’m on Goodreads, finally. Please connect with me over there. I’m still finding my way around. It’ll be nice to bump into friends.

Did I mention that I’ve published a novelette?

Have a look!

Overnight, users of the popular social networking site, Know-Me, acquire a duplicate, but dissimilar, identity. Though he claims to be shocked by the doubles’ debut, Know-Me’s CEO, Jason Vrabek, has impressed even himself with this latest testament to his genius. He swears his company has not launched a massive social experiment, something Know-Me has been accused of in the past. While experts investigate the phenomenon, the doubles engage with their counterparts, and Vrabek collects the data.

Alice Merkanowsky, an ordinary office worker, is enthralled with her duplicate self, the glamorous wife of a celebrity chef. Her thrill soon turns into an obsession which strains her marriage, and threatens her grip on reality.

Alice isn’t the only Know-Me casualty. Hoax, or not, the phenomenon triggers consequences that are frighteningly real, even for Vrabek who soon finds himself outmatched by his own genius double.

KNOW ME is now available on Amazon.